Posts tagged sorting

2019: Week 6: Weekly Orders & Sales by Segment

Those of you who know me well know that I like to create visualizations that include both detail and aggregate in the same view.  I have a particular interest in showing how the smaller components contribute to the overall.  When there’s one major chart on a dashboard I think it works out particularly well – keeping high level attention focused on the macro data shapes, but providing exploratory capabilities in the micro.

This week’s workout is also a little more on the arty side.  The original inspiration for this comes from something I built at work, but once I retooled it using Superstore I was struck by how the result looked like trees.  To add to the whimsy, I’ve included tree trunks which contribute to the overall look/feel and provide the macro details.

But don’t be fooled, although this viz looks pretty, it’s packed with some real takeaways that I’m confident you’ll be able to take back and implement at work.  You’ll want to pay close attention to the viz in tooltip.

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1300 x 800, 2 sheets – one for the main viz and one for the VIT
  • Create a tree plot that shows individual orders by week
    • Size of order = sales
    • Circles sorted by sales
    • Make trunk that is the # of orders for the week/segment
  • Create a highlight table VIT with a order summary
    • Sales and quantity by subcategory
    • Sales should have more orange = more sales
    • No color for quantity
  • Include a Region filter (to see the beautiful forests change)
  • Match any additional formatting and tooltip language

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Week 52: Nobel Laureates, 1901 to Present

Congratulations for making it to the end of 2018 and the last workout of the year!  This week I’ve spiced things up a bit and decided to use a different data set.  The data you’ll be working with is a list of Nobel Prize Laureates from 1901 to 2018 (‘present’ at time of writing).  And I’ve chosen to use the data set to construct a timeline view.

This data set comes from a real life problem I solved recently – a way to work with multiple date columns to construct timelines.  You’ll be forced to work with the data set as-is, no reshaping the data.  And the goal is to display multiple dates as marks of different colors.  And true to form, you’ll also be constructing some custom labels, and be working on creating a drop-down that sorts both alphabetically and by dates.

I hope you’re intrigued!

Click to view interactive version on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1000 x 1200; you choose # of sheets
  • Create a timeline showing birth date, prize date(s), death date or today
    • Death date will be a circle, today will be a gantt bar
    • Assume that each prize is awarded on December 10th of every year
  • Color the dots of the prize dates according to their category
  • Create a line that goes from birth date to death/today depending on the person
  • Construct a label that is beneath each person’s timeline – make sure it only shows up once
    • Include critical birth/death dates
  • Create reference lines for December 1901, the first year of the prize and today (which should be dynamic)
  • Create a legend that acts as a filter
  • Construct sorting for each of the following
    • Alphabetical
    • Birth date newest/oldest
    • Prize date newest/oldest
    • Death date newest/oldest
  • Match formatting & tooltips
    • I’m using Tableau Medium and Tableau Bold this week
    • Colors are from Superfishel Stone

Dataset

This week uses a special Nobel Laureates data set modified from Kaggle (to include more birthdays, and default birth dates to January 1 of the year if unknown).  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2018 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden@curtisharris_@RodyZakovich, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.