Posts tagged formatting

2019 Week 21: Profitability & Sales Dot Plot

One of my favorite chart types is a dot plot/strip plot.  There’s something really special about dots displayed across a single horizontal or vertical axis.  They tend to work really well when you’re showing a lot of data and have the advantage of being able to compare spread and density across different categories within a dimension.  To enhance the dot plot, I wanted to take some time for this workout and try out a few additional data encoding techniques.  The real “use case” of this particular visualization showing manufacturer sales & profitability by sub-category may not be the best translation, but I’m confident there’s a business use case out there for this chart!

So for the workout this week, you’ll be asked to add on additional encoding and enhance the dot plot beyond the default.  You’ll have the size of the dot represent Sales and use color in 2 different ways: first to re-encode Profit Ratio and also as a way to demonstrate the top performer within a Sub-Category.  You can expect some common design elements from me – including dynamic tooltips based on the data, upper case words, and non-default headers.

click to view on Tableau Public

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 1300; you choose the # of sheets
  • Create a dot plot that shows Profit Ratio and Sales by manufacturer and sub-category
    • Profit Ratio on the X-axis and on color
    • Sales on size
    • The top performing manufacturer within each sub-category should have a black bottom-half to and label
  • Watch out for the tooltip flavor text on the top performers
  • Color scale is Color Brewer Red, Yellow, Green (-1 to 1) – if you don’t already have it, download via Jacob Olsufka’s Tableau Public
  • Create headers for the sub-categories that extend into the data area
  • Add on a Region filter and ensure your headers match the data when you filter
  • Sort the data appropriately (sub-category by profit ratio)
  • Match any final formatting/tooltips (I went pretty easy on you this week!)

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

 

Week 17: Can you build an automated monthly report

A few weeks ago I had this problem: I needed to create a dynamic table that showed the last 12 full months of sales for a particular channel/category of the business but I also needed to show the month-over-month and year-over-year totals. I didn’t know how to do it right away so I asked the Workout Wednesday team and they responded with many solutions. So I changed this week to match that exact problem. I’m also including some information on financial reporting since I wasn’t familiar until recently. We’ll be calculating basis points. The basic formula is (%a -%b)*10000. Where a and b are just two percentages. This means 1 bps = 0.01% and 100 bps = 1.00%.

Challenge


Click image to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

Intermediate

  • Format: 1100px by 400px
  • Create a table that shows the following metrics for the last 12 full months by category:
    • Percent of total sales that are from the Consumer segment.
    • Month-over-month change in % Consumer sales using basis points (bps). (Current Month % – Prior Month %) * 10000
    • Year-over-year change in % Consumer sales using basis points (bps). (Current Month % – Same month prior year %) * 10000
  • Add a filter so that you can toggle dates. Note the months will only show when data is for a complete month of data.
  • Match formatting border and fill formatting.
  • ├ and └ will be useful.

    Dataset


    This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

    Share

    After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

    Track your progress

    Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

    Attribute

    When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


2019 Week 8: What percentage of products make up 80% of sales?

For this week’s workout, we look at one of my favorite chart types, the pareto. I love the pareto chart as a data exploration resource, and also as a powerful analytic resource. If you aren’t familiar with the pareto, the purpose is to see what % of x, makes up what % of y, with the common assumption that 20% of the x makes up 80% of the y. This week’s workout takes this chart a couple steps further by identifying the point where the % of x crosses 80% of the y. We will also give our users the power to drill into the actual values of any subset of the x. A key piece of this challenge is using Tableau’s built in functionality to your advantage, try and build this viz with two or less written calculated fields!

Have fun!

Requirements

  • Dashboard size is 1200×500 – 2 sheets
  • Place a circle on the mark where the % of Total Products crosses the 80% of Total Sales threshold
  • Place a reference line at 80% of Total Sales and 20% of Total Products
  • Use Tableau’s out of the box features – only two written calculated fields allowed
  • Dynamically show/hide selected products from the pareto chart
  • Make sure there is 15px of inner padding on all sides of your worksheets, and the left and right sides of your title and line separator
  • Match colors, tooltips, fonts, and formatting

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 5: Where are the biggest discounts?

I recently put together this chart for work. I spent more time making it amazing than I am willing to admit, this is mostly due to the amount of formatting I did. I thought I’d make a formatting challenge this week!

Challenge


Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 540px by 800px
  • Create a heat map of average discount by sub-category and region.
  • Labels for region should be below the heat map tiles.
  • Use Tableau Light, Size 7 for the tile labels.
  • Use Tableau Light, Size 8, Color #555555 for the column and row labels.
  • Sort sub-categories within each category by average discount.
  • Use Tableau Medium, Size 9, Color #898989 for the category header label.
  • Add bars above and to the right of the heat map indicating the average discount for sub-category and region.
  • The bars should be approximately 2px away from the heat map tiles.
  • Make sure the bar sizes are identical.
  • Add labels to the right of the bars for the bar chart to the right of the heat map.
  • Add labels above the bars to the bar chart above the heat map.
  • Use Tableau Light, Size 9, Color #555555 for the bar labels.
  • Set the color range for all objects to be between 0% and 50%.
  • Create a custom sequential color palette. Use #4A4E68.
  • Add just a tiny amount of white space between each heat map tile (~1px).
  • Add a divider between categories for the entire visualization set. Use #D4D4D4.
  • Add padding of 80px to the left of the visualizations and 50px to the right.
  • Dataset

    This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

    Share

    After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

    Track your progress

    Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

    Attribute

    When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.