Posts in Workout Wednesday

2019 Week 20: Can you show the top and bottom states for total orders

This week Ann and I are doing a live Workout Wednesday for the San Fransisco Bay Area Tableau User Group, so I tried to make sure this challenge can be done in 30 minutes.

Challenge


Click image to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 750px by 850px
  • Create a bar-on-bar chart that shows:
    • A top bar counting distinct orders for 2018.
    • A bottom bar counting distinct orders for 2017.
    • The top 10 states for total orders in 2018.
    • The bottom 5 states for total orders in 2018.
    • The average for all other states.
  • Add a label that show the total orders for 2018 for the bottom and top states and shows the average total orders per state for the Other States
  • Add another label that shows the year-over-year change. Use arrows (↓ and ↑) to indicate the change. When there is no change use NC.
  • Add a filter for Category.
  • Sort by total orders in 2018.
  • Make the bar for the top 10, bottom 5, and all others 3 different colors.
  • Add labels for the Top and the Bottom.
  • Match formatting and tooltips.
  • Dataset


    This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

    Share

    After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

    Track your progress

    Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

    Attribute

    When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


2019 Week 18: Let’s Compare Quarterly Sales Performance

Have you ever been asked to make a tool that allows end users to dynamically select two periods and compare them?  The challenge this week takes inspiration from this all too likely to be asked request.  At surface level it can be an easy ask, but how can you add on additional context along with a responsive and intuitive design that allows for a good user experience.

In this challenge you’ll be creating 3 often used chart types: a line chart, bar chart, and BAN (big ass number).  The twist?  You’ll be adding on custom axes that reference color identifiers throughout the dashboard and ensuring that the most recent quarter selected is always highlighted.  And what happens if someone accidentally selects the same quarter and tries to compare it to itself?  Well you’ve got that covered too with some nice flavor text to help them along.

CLICK TO VIEW ON TABLEAU PUBLIC

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1500 x 900; maximum of 3 sheets; No text boxes!
  • Create a line chart that does the following after a user selects 2 different quarters
    • Shows the running total of sales by day
    • The older quarter is gray, newer quarter is blue
    • The axis at the top displays dates related to the newer quarter
    • The axis at the bottom displays dates related to the older quarter
    • The tooltip references the order date, # of days into the quarter and the running total sales amount
  • Create a BAN that shows the percentage difference
    • The older quarter is always the “compared to” or prior value
    • When the quarters are the same, text displays “Change Comparisons”
  • Create a bar chart that shows total sales for each selected quarter
    • Bars should always have the blue bar on the right (newer quarter)
  • Create a dynamic title that always shows the newer quarter first and in blue
  • Match all tooltips, labels, and formatting (including axes)
    • Blue: #2cb5c0
    • Gray: #b4b7b7

I highly recommend you view the original on Tableau Public to see functionality in action.

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 16: Was it busy?

This week we’ll be taking inspiration from a chart you are likely familiar with, Google’s “Is it busy?” chart. This visualization is probably my favorite Google feature, outside of the dinosaur run game of course, so I felt like it was time to turn it into a Workout Wednesday challenge. Can you figure out if Superstore was busy or not?

Challenge

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 800px by 450px
  • Create a histogram that displays the average number of daily orders for each day of the week
  • Overlay a “selected date” bar that displays the number of orders for the day in question
  • Only display bar labels for the “selected date” bar
  • Make sure the y-axis always extends to the highest value the “selected date” bar could be
    • If the day’s order count is the highest value it could be, label “as busy as it gets”
    • If the day’s order count is 80% or more of the highest value it could be, label “very busy”
    • If the day’s order count is 60-79% of the highest value it could be, label “pretty busy”
    • If the day’s order count is 40-59% of the highest value it could be, label “busy”
    • If the day’s order count is higher than the average day, label “busier than normal”
    • If none of the above, label “not busy”
  • Provide the contextual text below histogram
  • Do not use any table calculations
  • Match formatting as closely as possible

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


2019 Week 14: Can you build a line chart with dynamic highlight and comparison?

Care to join me on an adventure to the dark side?  While it’s true I might not yet have the Sith skills of Curtis when it comes to the dark side, I’ve decided to tip the balance of the force toward the dark this week.

The workout this week combines a few concepts inspired by a recent work project someone shared with me.  The inspired ask was to create a way to have more user-driven comparisons while retaining other peer information in the background.  The end user experience was to be very direct – the user should know what has been clicked and more supporting information should appear in context.  The resultant dashboard serves up a fun (and colorful) way to dynamically highlight subcategories for comparison while revealing their monthly averages.  Per usual, the devil’s in the details on this one, so make sure you study the final requirements and dashboard carefully.

Click to View on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1300 x 1000; no more than 3 sheets
  • Limit data to 2018, Office Supplies
  • Create a line chart that does the following
    • When clicking on a subcategory at the top, the chosen subcategory will highlight teal and an average line will appear
    • The chosen subcategory will disappear from the bottom selections
    • The chosen subcategory will move to the far left and be teal (remaining sort is ascending by sales)
    • When clicking on a subcategory at the bottom, the next chosen category will highlight hot pink and an average line will appear
    • The bottom chosen subcategory will disappear from the top selections
    • The chosen subcategory will move to the far left and be hot pink
  • When one or more lines is highlighted, the non-highlighted subcategories will change to a darker gray
  • Dark mode
    • Background: #555555
    • Teal: #00c0c6
    • Hot Pink: #f0007b
    • Gray 1: #959595
    • Gray 2: #757575
  • Match all tooltips, labels, and formatting

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 13: Can you create a dynamic view of historical DATA prices?

This week were taking a look at Tableau Stock prices using candlestick charts. So whats different about this? The dates aggregate at differet levels depending on the number of candlesticks! This challenge is not easy so there are 2 achievement levels. You can make this chart using either a gantt chart or by unioning the data to itself. I’d recommend the latter.

Challenge


Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

Intermediate

  • Format: 800px by 800px
  • Create a candlestick chart with two stick that dynamically changes date based on the date ranges selected.
    • If there are more than 20 months of dates: aggregate to month.
    • If there are less than 20 months of dates but more than 15 weeks of dates: aggregate to week
    • If there are less than 15 weeks of dates: aggregate to days
  • For the “background” candlestick: the high point should be the highest high from the dynamic date period; the low point should be the lowest low from the dynamic date period.
  • For the “foreground” candlestick: two values should be the open of the first date of the dynamic date period and the close of the last day of the dynamic date period.
  • Add color to show whether the final close price is higher or lower than the first open price.
  • To filter the data create two parameters: One that selects a date in the center of a time period and another that helps you select dates prior to and after the center date. (ex: selecting a value of 7 for 2019-March-23 will filter from 2019-March-20 to 2019-March-27)
  • Match tooltips and formatting
  • Advanced

  • Add a second chart that shows the entirety of the data but uses reference lines to suggest the range of data showing above it.
  • Use rounded corners on your candlesticks.
  • Dataset

    This week uses Tableau stock prices.  You can get it here at data.world

    Share

    After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

    Track your progress

    Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

    Attribute

    When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


2019 Week 12: Customer Retention

My personal favorite Workout Wednesday challenges are those that come straight from the workplace, this is one of those weeks. Just recently I was asked to produce a very similar visualization, but with the affordance of my good friend Alteryx. For this challenge, all of the data prep has to be done in Tableau, without any alterations to the base data source. Enjoy!

Challenge

 

Click to view on Tableau Public

Concept

To get you started on the line chart, here is the concept of the visualization. If you were to single out customers who placed an order in any given week, what percentage of those same customers came back 1-week later, 4-weeks later, 12-weeks later?

Requirements

  • Dashboard Format: 900px by 500px
  • One sheet
  • 30px padding on all sides
  • No duplicating, scaffolding, or other data source alterations allowed… just Superstore data as it is packaged
  • Make sure that the x-axis always displays weeks 0-12, even if a week does not have any returning customers
  • Match formatting as close as possible, and tooltips exactly as pictured… teal color is #499894

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

2019 Week 11: Profit: Where? and What?

This weeks Workout Wednesday, has lots of hidden tricks and tips inside. But I want you to mainly focus on a specific part. Sorting in Tableau can be a bit of a pain, it has gotten much better with nested sorting. But this challenge allows you to sort A – Z, Z – A, Profit Asc and Profit Desc, now how do you do that?

I also still love Viz in Tooltips, the novelty certainly hasn’t worn off. So this week I focused on a heavily formatted Viz in Tooltip.

Challenge

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

    • Size 600 x 1000 px, 5 sheets.
    • Create a Map which shows Profit by state and Cities sized and coloured by profit
    • Create a City, Abbreviated State (Calc below) by profit.
    • Create a parameter that allows you to sort City, State by A – Z, Z – A, Profit Asc, Profit Desc.
    • Create a Viz in Tooltip
      • City, State and Profit
      • Sub-Category Profit
      • Match all Formatting
    • Use the map to filter by STATE
    • Match all formatting, titles, text and colours.

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


Abbreviation Calculation

CASE [State]
WHEN "Alabama" THEN "AL"
WHEN "Alaska" THEN "AK"
WHEN "Arkansas" THEN "AR"
WHEN "Arizona" THEN "AZ"
WHEN "California" THEN "CA"
WHEN "Colorado" THEN "CO"
WHEN "Connecticut" THEN "CT"
WHEN  "Delaware" THEN "DE"
WHEN "District of Columbia" THEN "DC"
WHEN "Florida" THEN "FL"
WHEN "Georgia" THEN "GA"
WHEN "Idaho" THEN "ID"
WHEN "Illinois" THEN "IL"
WHEN "Indiana" THEN "IN"
WHEN "Iowa" THEN "IA"
WHEN "Kansas" THEN "KS"
WHEN "Kentucky" THEN "KY"
WHEN  "Louisiana" THEN "LA"
WHEN "Maine" THEN "ME"
WHEN "Maryland" THEN "MD"
WHEN "Massachusetts" THEN "MA"
WHEN "Michigan" THEN "MI"
WHEN "Minnesota" THEN "MN"
WHEN "Mississippi" THEN "MS"
WHEN "Missouri" THEN "MO"
WHEN "Montana" THEN "MT"
WHEN "Nebraska" THEN "NE"
WHEN "Nevada" THEN "NV"
WHEN "New Hampshire"	THEN "NH"
WHEN "New Jersey" THEN "NJ"
WHEN "New Mexico" THEN "NM"
WHEN "New York" THEN "NY"
WHEN "North Carolina" THEN "NC"	
WHEN "North Dakota" THEN "ND"
WHEN "Ohio" THEN "OH"
WHEN "Oklahoma" THEN "OK"	
WHEN "Oregon" THEN "OR"
WHEN "Pennsylvania" THEN "PA"
WHEN "Rhode Island" THEN "RI"
WHEN "South Carolina" THEN "SC"
WHEN "South Dakota" THEN "SD"
WHEN "Tennessee" THEN "TN"
WHEN "Texas" THEN "TX"
WHEN "Utah" THEN "UT"
WHEN "Vermont" THEN "VT"
WHEN "Virginia" THEN "VA"
WHEN "Washington" THEN "WA"
WHEN "West Virginia" THEN "WV"
WHEN "Wisconsin" THEN "WI"
WHEN "Wyoming" THEN "WY"
END

2019 Week 10: How Has Our Profit Ratio Changed Nationally?

This week’s challenge is plucked directly from #IronQuest.  If you’re not aware of what #IronQuest is, it’s a monthly challenge during the off season of Tableau Public’s Iron Viz feeder contest.  It’s run by Sarah Bartlett and each month a different theme is chosen.  Participants are allowed to submit for feedback (the idea is to prepare for Iron Viz and to get more comfortable building out new content).  The month of February just closed with a very appropriate theme voted on by the public, Business Dashboards.  You can check out the full list of dashboards (there’s 30+) at Sarah’s blog.  Since the theme falls heavily in line with Workout Wednesday (most of our challenges come directly from our day-to-day work), I decided to bring my own submission for #IronQuest over as a challenge.

The final dashboard you’ll be rebuilding is a major component of a dashboard I recently built.  It was born out of the challenge of showing all 50 states plus DC in a single view.  The size of the states was problematic for showing a metric – as the size of the geography was dwarfing the overall performance of all the states.  And of course Hawaii and Alaska fell victim to not fitting neatly on a map, so our first goal was to create a view that more cleanly displayed all the states.  In addition to the first concept, we wanted to compare performance over a specific time period (it’s one year for the sake of the workout) and quickly identify improvements and performance gaps.

The final visualization you’ll be rebuilding is a tile map (I’ve chosen to go NPR style) that allows for YoY comparison of profit ratio.

Click to view on Tableau Public

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 900; 1 sheet
  • Create a tile map showing 2017 vs 2018 profit ratio
    • 2018 = smaller square; 2017 = larger square (Thanks Bryan!)
    • Can use this blog post as inspiration and base file for map from Brittany Fong
  • Build a calculated field that shows the percentage change in profit ratio YoY and place on label
    • Formatting must match (use AZ, IL, and MI as references)
  • Color profit ratio using the scale in the upper right
  • Match all additional labels, tooltips, and formatting that you spot (including the year labels on Florida!)

Lastly – you are not allowed to use Level of Detail (LOD) Expressions!

Dataset

This week you’ll have to use a modified version of Superstore to allow for more variety and all 50 (+1) states from data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 9: Can you remove the scroll bar?

When I started Workout Wednesday I made a list of potential challenges. This challenge was the second challenge I wrote down. After more than 20 challenges I’ve finally gotten around to sharing it!

Challenge


Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 1000px by 600px
  • Create a visualization with bar charts that show total sales, total profit, and total quantity by city-state (See below for state abbrevation calculation). Sort by sales.
  • Create a calculation that you can use as a filter that shows cities in groups of 10. Make sure the labels based on the rank i.e. the top ten are 1-10, the 2nd 10 are 11-20, ect.
  • Make sure the bar size remain proportional with the maximum value for each. Do not used a fixed axis.
  • Add a zero line for profit only.
  • Match formatting: Size 11 font, bar color #ED7470.
  • Dataset

    This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

    Share

    After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

    Track your progress

    Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

    Attribute

    When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


    Abbreviation Calculation

    CASE [State]
    WHEN "Alabama" THEN "AL"
    WHEN "Alaska" THEN "AK"
    WHEN "Arkansas" THEN "AR"
    WHEN "Arizona" THEN "AZ"
    WHEN "California" THEN "CA"
    WHEN "Colorado" THEN "CO"
    WHEN "Connecticut" THEN "CT"
    WHEN  "Delaware" THEN "DE"
    WHEN "District of Columbia" THEN "DC"
    WHEN "Florida" THEN "FL"
    WHEN "Georgia" THEN "GA"
    WHEN "Idaho" THEN "ID"
    WHEN "Illinois" THEN "IL"
    WHEN "Indiana" THEN "IN"
    WHEN "Iowa" THEN "IA"
    WHEN "Kansas" THEN "KS"
    WHEN "Kentucky" THEN "KY"
    WHEN  "Louisiana" THEN "LA"
    WHEN "Maine" THEN "ME"
    WHEN "Maryland" THEN "MD"
    WHEN "Massachusetts" THEN "MA"
    WHEN "Michigan" THEN "MI"
    WHEN "Minnesota" THEN "MN"
    WHEN "Mississippi" THEN "MS"
    WHEN "Missouri" THEN "MO"
    WHEN "Montana" THEN "MT"
    WHEN "Nebraska" THEN "NE"
    WHEN "Nevada" THEN "NV"
    WHEN "New Hampshire"	THEN "NH"
    WHEN "New Jersey" THEN "NJ"
    WHEN "New Mexico" THEN "NM"
    WHEN "New York" THEN "NY"
    WHEN "North Carolina" THEN "NC"	
    WHEN "North Dakota" THEN "ND"
    WHEN "Ohio" THEN "OH"
    WHEN "Oklahoma" THEN "OK"	
    WHEN "Oregon" THEN "OR"
    WHEN "Pennsylvania" THEN "PA"
    WHEN "Rhode Island" THEN "RI"
    WHEN "South Carolina" THEN "SC"
    WHEN "South Dakota" THEN "SD"
    WHEN "Tennessee" THEN "TN"
    WHEN "Texas" THEN "TX"
    WHEN "Utah" THEN "UT"
    WHEN "Vermont" THEN "VT"
    WHEN "Virginia" THEN "VA"
    WHEN "Washington" THEN "WA"
    WHEN "West Virginia" THEN "WV"
    WHEN "Wisconsin" THEN "WI"
    WHEN "Wyoming" THEN "WY"
    END
    

2019 Week 8: What percentage of products make up 80% of sales?

For this week’s workout, we look at one of my favorite chart types, the pareto. I love the pareto chart as a data exploration resource, and also as a powerful analytic resource. If you aren’t familiar with the pareto, the purpose is to see what % of x, makes up what % of y, with the common assumption that 20% of the x makes up 80% of the y. This week’s workout takes this chart a couple steps further by identifying the point where the % of x crosses 80% of the y. We will also give our users the power to drill into the actual values of any subset of the x. A key piece of this challenge is using Tableau’s built in functionality to your advantage, try and build this viz with two or less written calculated fields!

Have fun!

Requirements

  • Dashboard size is 1200×500 – 2 sheets
  • Place a circle on the mark where the % of Total Products crosses the 80% of Total Sales threshold
  • Place a reference line at 80% of Total Sales and 20% of Total Products
  • Use Tableau’s out of the box features – only two written calculated fields allowed
  • Dynamically show/hide selected products from the pareto chart
  • Make sure there is 15px of inner padding on all sides of your worksheets, and the left and right sides of your title and line separator
  • Match colors, tooltips, fonts, and formatting

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.