Posts in Workout Wednesday

2019 Week 29: Which months do we see a higher number of orders?

Last week we were putting together a deck for an executive team and we wanted to show the seasonality of data while still showing the overall average. In our time crunch we came up with our challenge for this week!p

Challenge – Intermediate


Click image to view on Tableau Public

Requirements – Intermediate

  • Format: 900px by 600px
  • Create a line that shows the total orders per day by segment. Show the value on the left side of the line.
  • For each month, show a bar above or below the line with the orders per day for that month.
  • Label the bars with the percent difference between the monthly value and the overall value.
  • Match tooltips.
  • Color choices are up to you.

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1. You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Solution

Watch

 

Week 28: Workout Wednesday Weather

I recently came across a material design style guide for data visualization, and wanted to try some of the concepts. Google has many design guides based on their material design concept, but none related to data visualization until just recently. These style guides are great for getting new ideas, just make sure you don’t get too hung up trying to precisely replicate in Tableau… it won’t always work out that way! For this week’s challenge, I decided to focus on one specific visualization from this particular style guide:

I’m going to go ahead and say that someone out there could replicate this 100% accurately in Tableau, but there are a few elements where the juice just isn’t worth the squeeze. I chose this particular chart because of the elements that focus on, or could focus on scale. With that, here is this week’s challenge.. average monthly temperatures in the home bases of the Workout Wednesday crew.

Click to see the Tableau Public visualization

Data

https://data.world/curtisharris7/workout-wednesday-2019-week-28

Requirements

  • Dashboard size 1000×800
  • All elements should be in a vertical container, except for the filter
  • Provide 150px padding on all sides of the vertical container
  • Make sure values display the degrees symbol as a suffix
  • Axis should display marks every 20 degrees, and should provide context to the reader at the top most mark
  • Add a reference line for the current month, that will update automatically as the year goes on
  • Add a circle over the point in the lines that represents the current month’s average temp
  • Add a label for the hottest city, in the current month, for all of the cities in the view
    • If you filter out Phoenix, the label should move to Salt Lake City
  • Add a simple color legend that updates as the filter changes
  • Turn off tooltips – not necessary for the challenge

Solution Video

If you need some help, check out the solution video!

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Week 27: Can you build a dynamic KPI view?

How often do you think about scale? Making sure my dashboards scale over time is one of my top priorities whenever I start a new project, so this week’s Workout Wednesday is going to be focused on building a solution that will scale combined with standard KPI views. I’ve been asked to build KPI views many times in my career, and I’m always looking for ways to inject pieces of interactivity, while keeping the high level view in tact – this challenge should help you think of ways you can incorporate Workout Wednesday directly into your work.

Have fun!

Challenge

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 720x420px
  • Create a summary view that can display the Category or Segment dimension on demand
    • The summary value should represent the profit ratio for the most recent week/month/quarter in the data, depending on what your date parameter is set to
    • The additional up/down number should represent the absolute percentage point change from the previous week/month/quarter
  • Create a dynamic color legend for the Category or Segment dimension members, that highlights the dimension member your user is hovering over
  • Create a line chart that displays the overall profit ratio for the last n weeks/months/quarters (as decided by the slider in the top right)
    • The line chart should also support an additional line for the dimension member your user is hovering over
  • Turn off all the tooltips – you’re welcome
  • Where you are assuming black, use #181818 instead
  • Where you are assuming white, use #e6e6e6 instead
  • Match all other colors as close as you’d like

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

2019 Week 24: Can you build a side-by-side bar chart?

This week you need to build this side-by-side bar chart. There are a couple of tricks but you should be able to do this in under 30 minutes (for real!). There are at least 4 ways to solve this problem. There are also two problems an intermediate and an advanced.

Challenge – Intermediate


Click image to view on Tableau Public

Requirements – Intermediate

  • Format: 600px by 600px
  • Create side-by-side bar chart that shows:
    • profit ratio for the Home Office segment and category.
    • Overall Profit ratio for all segments by category.
    • Profit Ratio: sum(profit)/sum(sales)
  • Add a label for the Overall bar and the Home Office bar
  • Inside the Home Office bar show the percent difference between Home Office and Overall — ([Home Office] – [Overall])/[Overall]
  • Make sure a footer of the categories shows up at the bottom of the dashboard.
  • Color choices are up to you.
  • Challenge – Advanced


    Click image to view on Tableau Public

    Requirements

    • Follow all intermediate requirements.
    • Create bars so there is more space between categories.
    • No annotations allowed
    • SUPER DUPER WAYYYYYYY ADVANCED OPTIONAL: Do not use Measure Names or Measure Values. Do not use table calculations.
    • Dataset


      This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

      Share

      After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

      Track your progress

      Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

      Attribute

      When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


2019 Week 23: Can you get creative with bar charts?

What do you do when you have limited real estate? What do you do when vanilla Tableau just isn’t going to cut it? This week’s workout should be a quick exercise designed to give you a few strategies that save on real estate, enable simple interactivity, and promote consistent design throughout your dashboards. This one shouldn’t take you very long, but it should give you a chance to think a little outside the box!

Challenge

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 375x667px
  • Create a bar chart which displays the sub-category label on top of its bar
  • Label all bars to the right of the maximum value in view
  • Create a parameter that changes the display from a percent of total view to a raw order count view
  • Create a progress shadow for every bar
    • Show progress to 100% or progress to the maximum value depending on the parameter selection
  • Only use one sheet
  • Match formatting and colors #222222, #181818, #f28e2b
  • Match tooltips
  • Make sure there is adequate padding from the edges of the dashboard

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

2019 Week 22: X percent of Orders make up X percent of Sales

Ohhhh it’s time for some shiny new features! Parameter actions dropped last week and what a hit they have been! People are republishing their work using the new feature! So I hope you’ve had time to practice them a little bit because we’re about to hit the ground running with them!

Click to Interact

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 700 x 700
  • Create a small multiple Pareto chart based on sub category, sales and number of orders
  • Create a parameter to select which measure you want to compare against (Sales or Orders)
  • Add in reference lines on both axis
  • When sales is selected, there should be a % reference line across the Y axis, with the X axis reference line being the point of interception on the pareto, and when orders is selected, there should be a % reference line across the X axis, with the Y axis reference line being the point of that interception.
  • Use Parameter Actions ONLY to change those reference lines on hover
  • Match tooltips and colours.
  • Make sure your title is dynamic too

Data

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden@curtisharris_!, and @Tableau

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Hints

This Blog by Kevin Flerlage might help you along your way with Parameter Action

 

2019 Week 21: Profitability & Sales Dot Plot

One of my favorite chart types is a dot plot/strip plot.  There’s something really special about dots displayed across a single horizontal or vertical axis.  They tend to work really well when you’re showing a lot of data and have the advantage of being able to compare spread and density across different categories within a dimension.  To enhance the dot plot, I wanted to take some time for this workout and try out a few additional data encoding techniques.  The real “use case” of this particular visualization showing manufacturer sales & profitability by sub-category may not be the best translation, but I’m confident there’s a business use case out there for this chart!

So for the workout this week, you’ll be asked to add on additional encoding and enhance the dot plot beyond the default.  You’ll have the size of the dot represent Sales and use color in 2 different ways: first to re-encode Profit Ratio and also as a way to demonstrate the top performer within a Sub-Category.  You can expect some common design elements from me – including dynamic tooltips based on the data, upper case words, and non-default headers.

click to view on Tableau Public

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 1300; you choose the # of sheets
  • Create a dot plot that shows Profit Ratio and Sales by manufacturer and sub-category
    • Profit Ratio on the X-axis and on color
    • Sales on size
    • The top performing manufacturer within each sub-category should have a black bottom-half to and label
  • Watch out for the tooltip flavor text on the top performers
  • Color scale is Color Brewer Red, Yellow, Green (-1 to 1) – if you don’t already have it, download via Jacob Olsufka’s Tableau Public
  • Create headers for the sub-categories that extend into the data area
  • Add on a Region filter and ensure your headers match the data when you filter
  • Sort the data appropriately (sub-category by profit ratio)
  • Match any final formatting/tooltips (I went pretty easy on you this week!)

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

 

2019 Week 20: Can you show the top and bottom states for total orders

This week Ann and I are doing a live Workout Wednesday for the San Fransisco Bay Area Tableau User Group, so I tried to make sure this challenge can be done in 30 minutes.

Challenge


Click image to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 750px by 850px
  • Create a bar-on-bar chart that shows:
    • A top bar counting distinct orders for 2018.
    • A bottom bar counting distinct orders for 2017.
    • The top 10 states for total orders in 2018.
    • The bottom 5 states for total orders in 2018.
    • The average for all other states.
  • Add a label that show the total orders for 2018 for the bottom and top states and shows the average total orders per state for the Other States
  • Add another label that shows the year-over-year change. Use arrows (↓ and ↑) to indicate the change. When there is no change use NC.
  • Add a filter for Category.
  • Sort by total orders in 2018.
  • Make the bar for the top 10, bottom 5, and all others 3 different colors.
  • Add labels for the Top and the Bottom.
  • Match formatting and tooltips.
  • Dataset


    This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

    Share

    After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

    Track your progress

    Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

    Attribute

    When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.


2019 Week 18: Let’s Compare Quarterly Sales Performance

Have you ever been asked to make a tool that allows end users to dynamically select two periods and compare them?  The challenge this week takes inspiration from this all too likely to be asked request.  At surface level it can be an easy ask, but how can you add on additional context along with a responsive and intuitive design that allows for a good user experience.

In this challenge you’ll be creating 3 often used chart types: a line chart, bar chart, and BAN (big ass number).  The twist?  You’ll be adding on custom axes that reference color identifiers throughout the dashboard and ensuring that the most recent quarter selected is always highlighted.  And what happens if someone accidentally selects the same quarter and tries to compare it to itself?  Well you’ve got that covered too with some nice flavor text to help them along.

CLICK TO VIEW ON TABLEAU PUBLIC

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1500 x 900; maximum of 3 sheets; No text boxes!
  • Create a line chart that does the following after a user selects 2 different quarters
    • Shows the running total of sales by day
    • The older quarter is gray, newer quarter is blue
    • The axis at the top displays dates related to the newer quarter
    • The axis at the bottom displays dates related to the older quarter
    • The tooltip references the order date, # of days into the quarter and the running total sales amount
  • Create a BAN that shows the percentage difference
    • The older quarter is always the “compared to” or prior value
    • When the quarters are the same, text displays “Change Comparisons”
  • Create a bar chart that shows total sales for each selected quarter
    • Bars should always have the blue bar on the right (newer quarter)
  • Create a dynamic title that always shows the newer quarter first and in blue
  • Match all tooltips, labels, and formatting (including axes)
    • Blue: #2cb5c0
    • Gray: #b4b7b7

I highly recommend you view the original on Tableau Public to see functionality in action.

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 16: Was it busy?

This week we’ll be taking inspiration from a chart you are likely familiar with, Google’s “Is it busy?” chart. This visualization is probably my favorite Google feature, outside of the dinosaur run game of course, so I felt like it was time to turn it into a Workout Wednesday challenge. Can you figure out if Superstore was busy or not?

Challenge

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Format: 800px by 450px
  • Create a histogram that displays the average number of daily orders for each day of the week
  • Overlay a “selected date” bar that displays the number of orders for the day in question
  • Only display bar labels for the “selected date” bar
  • Make sure the y-axis always extends to the highest value the “selected date” bar could be
    • If the day’s order count is the highest value it could be, label “as busy as it gets”
    • If the day’s order count is 80% or more of the highest value it could be, label “very busy”
    • If the day’s order count is 60-79% of the highest value it could be, label “pretty busy”
    • If the day’s order count is 40-59% of the highest value it could be, label “busy”
    • If the day’s order count is higher than the average day, label “busier than normal”
    • If none of the above, label “not busy”
  • Provide the contextual text below histogram
  • Do not use any table calculations
  • Match formatting as closely as possible

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.