Posts by Ann Jackson

2019 Week 21: Profitability & Sales Dot Plot

One of my favorite chart types is a dot plot/strip plot.  There’s something really special about dots displayed across a single horizontal or vertical axis.  They tend to work really well when you’re showing a lot of data and have the advantage of being able to compare spread and density across different categories within a dimension.  To enhance the dot plot, I wanted to take some time for this workout and try out a few additional data encoding techniques.  The real “use case” of this particular visualization showing manufacturer sales & profitability by sub-category may not be the best translation, but I’m confident there’s a business use case out there for this chart!

So for the workout this week, you’ll be asked to add on additional encoding and enhance the dot plot beyond the default.  You’ll have the size of the dot represent Sales and use color in 2 different ways: first to re-encode Profit Ratio and also as a way to demonstrate the top performer within a Sub-Category.  You can expect some common design elements from me – including dynamic tooltips based on the data, upper case words, and non-default headers.

click to view on Tableau Public

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 1300; you choose the # of sheets
  • Create a dot plot that shows Profit Ratio and Sales by manufacturer and sub-category
    • Profit Ratio on the X-axis and on color
    • Sales on size
    • The top performing manufacturer within each sub-category should have a black bottom-half to and label
  • Watch out for the tooltip flavor text on the top performers
  • Color scale is Color Brewer Red, Yellow, Green (-1 to 1) – if you don’t already have it, download via Jacob Olsufka’s Tableau Public
  • Create headers for the sub-categories that extend into the data area
  • Add on a Region filter and ensure your headers match the data when you filter
  • Sort the data appropriately (sub-category by profit ratio)
  • Match any final formatting/tooltips (I went pretty easy on you this week!)

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

 

2019 Week 18: Let’s Compare Quarterly Sales Performance

Have you ever been asked to make a tool that allows end users to dynamically select two periods and compare them?  The challenge this week takes inspiration from this all too likely to be asked request.  At surface level it can be an easy ask, but how can you add on additional context along with a responsive and intuitive design that allows for a good user experience.

In this challenge you’ll be creating 3 often used chart types: a line chart, bar chart, and BAN (big ass number).  The twist?  You’ll be adding on custom axes that reference color identifiers throughout the dashboard and ensuring that the most recent quarter selected is always highlighted.  And what happens if someone accidentally selects the same quarter and tries to compare it to itself?  Well you’ve got that covered too with some nice flavor text to help them along.

CLICK TO VIEW ON TABLEAU PUBLIC

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1500 x 900; maximum of 3 sheets; No text boxes!
  • Create a line chart that does the following after a user selects 2 different quarters
    • Shows the running total of sales by day
    • The older quarter is gray, newer quarter is blue
    • The axis at the top displays dates related to the newer quarter
    • The axis at the bottom displays dates related to the older quarter
    • The tooltip references the order date, # of days into the quarter and the running total sales amount
  • Create a BAN that shows the percentage difference
    • The older quarter is always the “compared to” or prior value
    • When the quarters are the same, text displays “Change Comparisons”
  • Create a bar chart that shows total sales for each selected quarter
    • Bars should always have the blue bar on the right (newer quarter)
  • Create a dynamic title that always shows the newer quarter first and in blue
  • Match all tooltips, labels, and formatting (including axes)
    • Blue: #2cb5c0
    • Gray: #b4b7b7

I highly recommend you view the original on Tableau Public to see functionality in action.

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 14: Can you build a line chart with dynamic highlight and comparison?

Care to join me on an adventure to the dark side?  While it’s true I might not yet have the Sith skills of Curtis when it comes to the dark side, I’ve decided to tip the balance of the force toward the dark this week.

The workout this week combines a few concepts inspired by a recent work project someone shared with me.  The inspired ask was to create a way to have more user-driven comparisons while retaining other peer information in the background.  The end user experience was to be very direct – the user should know what has been clicked and more supporting information should appear in context.  The resultant dashboard serves up a fun (and colorful) way to dynamically highlight subcategories for comparison while revealing their monthly averages.  Per usual, the devil’s in the details on this one, so make sure you study the final requirements and dashboard carefully.

Click to View on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1300 x 1000; no more than 3 sheets
  • Limit data to 2018, Office Supplies
  • Create a line chart that does the following
    • When clicking on a subcategory at the top, the chosen subcategory will highlight teal and an average line will appear
    • The chosen subcategory will disappear from the bottom selections
    • The chosen subcategory will move to the far left and be teal (remaining sort is ascending by sales)
    • When clicking on a subcategory at the bottom, the next chosen category will highlight hot pink and an average line will appear
    • The bottom chosen subcategory will disappear from the top selections
    • The chosen subcategory will move to the far left and be hot pink
  • When one or more lines is highlighted, the non-highlighted subcategories will change to a darker gray
  • Dark mode
    • Background: #555555
    • Teal: #00c0c6
    • Hot Pink: #f0007b
    • Gray 1: #959595
    • Gray 2: #757575
  • Match all tooltips, labels, and formatting

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2019.1.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 10: How Has Our Profit Ratio Changed Nationally?

This week’s challenge is plucked directly from #IronQuest.  If you’re not aware of what #IronQuest is, it’s a monthly challenge during the off season of Tableau Public’s Iron Viz feeder contest.  It’s run by Sarah Bartlett and each month a different theme is chosen.  Participants are allowed to submit for feedback (the idea is to prepare for Iron Viz and to get more comfortable building out new content).  The month of February just closed with a very appropriate theme voted on by the public, Business Dashboards.  You can check out the full list of dashboards (there’s 30+) at Sarah’s blog.  Since the theme falls heavily in line with Workout Wednesday (most of our challenges come directly from our day-to-day work), I decided to bring my own submission for #IronQuest over as a challenge.

The final dashboard you’ll be rebuilding is a major component of a dashboard I recently built.  It was born out of the challenge of showing all 50 states plus DC in a single view.  The size of the states was problematic for showing a metric – as the size of the geography was dwarfing the overall performance of all the states.  And of course Hawaii and Alaska fell victim to not fitting neatly on a map, so our first goal was to create a view that more cleanly displayed all the states.  In addition to the first concept, we wanted to compare performance over a specific time period (it’s one year for the sake of the workout) and quickly identify improvements and performance gaps.

The final visualization you’ll be rebuilding is a tile map (I’ve chosen to go NPR style) that allows for YoY comparison of profit ratio.

Click to view on Tableau Public

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 900; 1 sheet
  • Create a tile map showing 2017 vs 2018 profit ratio
    • 2018 = smaller square; 2017 = larger square (Thanks Bryan!)
    • Can use this blog post as inspiration and base file for map from Brittany Fong
  • Build a calculated field that shows the percentage change in profit ratio YoY and place on label
    • Formatting must match (use AZ, IL, and MI as references)
  • Color profit ratio using the scale in the upper right
  • Match all additional labels, tooltips, and formatting that you spot (including the year labels on Florida!)

Lastly – you are not allowed to use Level of Detail (LOD) Expressions!

Dataset

This week you’ll have to use a modified version of Superstore to allow for more variety and all 50 (+1) states from data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019: Week 6: Weekly Orders & Sales by Segment

Those of you who know me well know that I like to create visualizations that include both detail and aggregate in the same view.  I have a particular interest in showing how the smaller components contribute to the overall.  When there’s one major chart on a dashboard I think it works out particularly well – keeping high level attention focused on the macro data shapes, but providing exploratory capabilities in the micro.

This week’s workout is also a little more on the arty side.  The original inspiration for this comes from something I built at work, but once I retooled it using Superstore I was struck by how the result looked like trees.  To add to the whimsy, I’ve included tree trunks which contribute to the overall look/feel and provide the macro details.

But don’t be fooled, although this viz looks pretty, it’s packed with some real takeaways that I’m confident you’ll be able to take back and implement at work.  You’ll want to pay close attention to the viz in tooltip.

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1300 x 800, 2 sheets – one for the main viz and one for the VIT
  • Create a tree plot that shows individual orders by week
    • Size of order = sales
    • Circles sorted by sales
    • Make trunk that is the # of orders for the week/segment
  • Create a highlight table VIT with a order summary
    • Sales and quantity by subcategory
    • Sales should have more orange = more sales
    • No color for quantity
  • Include a Region filter (to see the beautiful forests change)
  • Match any additional formatting and tooltip language

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden, and @curtisharris_!

Track Your Progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

2019 Week 2: Order Sales Spread by Region

Happy New Year!  It’s time for my first Workout Wednesday of 2019 and I hope you’re ready for a challenge.  This week I’ve decided to take inspiration from a trick or two from past workouts and combine them with some recent work I’ve been doing.  To be more specific, one thing about Tableau that I like is that you can set independent axes for continuous measures if you’ve got headers on the same shelf (rows or columns).  But what if you wanted to have independent axes and headers aren’t on the same shelf?  The workout this week explores that idea and puts it to the test – I’ll be honest, the jury is still out for me on if this works well with the Superstore data set, but I can absolutely see value in this if we were to have a similar metric with extremely varied ranges.

In addition to exploring how to get over that obstacle, I also wanted to play around with date filtering.  This week you’ll be exposed to a user-friendly calendar that doubles as a filter OR highlighter.  I’ve found that it represents a great way for end users to freely pick a single date, multiple dates, date ranges, random individual dates – pretty much any combination that they would like.  Calendars are also familiar visualizations of dates, so I think it’s quite comforting – and additionally it serves as another layer of information – when there isn’t any data, there isn’t a square for the date.

 

click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 800, jitterplots must be one sheet, everything else is up to you
  • Create a jitterplot that shows sales by order ID (no need to worry if your jitter isn’t exactly the same as mine)
    • Ensure that each plot behaves as if it has an “independent axis” and spans the extent of data within each region
  • Create a calendar view that can be used as a filter or a highlighter
    • When used as a filter, chosen dates will filter the jitterplot
    • When used as a highlighter, chosen dates will change to a darker color in jitterplot
  • Create a footnote that is responsive to the date selection
  • Create average line & callout that are responsive to date selection
  • Match colors & tooltips please 🙂

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Week 52: Nobel Laureates, 1901 to Present

Congratulations for making it to the end of 2018 and the last workout of the year!  This week I’ve spiced things up a bit and decided to use a different data set.  The data you’ll be working with is a list of Nobel Prize Laureates from 1901 to 2018 (‘present’ at time of writing).  And I’ve chosen to use the data set to construct a timeline view.

This data set comes from a real life problem I solved recently – a way to work with multiple date columns to construct timelines.  You’ll be forced to work with the data set as-is, no reshaping the data.  And the goal is to display multiple dates as marks of different colors.  And true to form, you’ll also be constructing some custom labels, and be working on creating a drop-down that sorts both alphabetically and by dates.

I hope you’re intrigued!

Click to view interactive version on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1000 x 1200; you choose # of sheets
  • Create a timeline showing birth date, prize date(s), death date or today
    • Death date will be a circle, today will be a gantt bar
    • Assume that each prize is awarded on December 10th of every year
  • Color the dots of the prize dates according to their category
  • Create a line that goes from birth date to death/today depending on the person
  • Construct a label that is beneath each person’s timeline – make sure it only shows up once
    • Include critical birth/death dates
  • Create reference lines for December 1901, the first year of the prize and today (which should be dynamic)
  • Create a legend that acts as a filter
  • Construct sorting for each of the following
    • Alphabetical
    • Birth date newest/oldest
    • Prize date newest/oldest
    • Death date newest/oldest
  • Match formatting & tooltips
    • I’m using Tableau Medium and Tableau Bold this week
    • Colors are from Superfishel Stone

Dataset

This week uses a special Nobel Laureates data set modified from Kaggle (to include more birthdays, and default birth dates to January 1 of the year if unknown).  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2018 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden@curtisharris_@RodyZakovich, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Week 49: Where Do Sub-Categories Succeed?

Last week I had the honor of attending Tapestry Conference in Miami.  While I was there Jon Schwabish gave a quick 6 minute talk that connected every chart to every other chart.  This along with some of Elijah Meek’s keynote mentioning that data viz is getting more custom and funky got me curious about some neglected chart types.  Combine this with a recent interest in how clustering works in Tableau and you’ve arrived at the genesis for this week’s challenge.  Your goal is to create a Parallel Coordinates chart (click the link if you’re not sure what it is).

This chart is perfect for multivariate analysis and seeing relationships among more than 2 measures (in this case 3).  It can also be useful for finding commonalities among things.  Traditionally I think most people may shy away from implementing this in Tableau because quite often different measures have different scales, so as part of the challenge, you’ll have to figure out how to overcome that obstacle to present a parallel coordinate chart with 3 measures of different magnitudes.

Also to help reinforce some recent challenges using table calculations – you are not allowed to use LODs and must only use table calculations and regular calcs.

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 850; you choose # of sheets
  • Create a parallel coordinate chart that shows Sales, Profit Ratio, and # Customers (CountD Customer Name) per sub-category
  • Do not use LODs, use table calculations (and normal calculated fields)
  • Each sub-category should be positioned based on its value, but all measures should be on one sheet
  • Ensure there is a dark gray vertical line for each measure
  • Label the top and bottom of each vertical line with the measure name and respective minimum or maximum
  • Color the lines based on which measure the sub-categories have the highest value in
  • Colors are based off of the Viridis color palette, which I encourage you to paste into your .TPS file
  • Create a color legend that has a hover action based on the newly defined colors (high sales, high profit ratio, high customers)
  • Match formatting & tooltips

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2018 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden@curtisharris_@RodyZakovich, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Week 44: Ready, Set: Let’s Drill Down on Sales!

At time of writing Tableau 2018.3 was just released.  With it comes some brand new features, including the one that’s the focus of this workout: set actions.  Sets have long been a feature in Tableau and are responsible for creating dashboard actions, but set actions are something completely new.  Set actions allow you to interact with your data to determine what data elements are part of the set, essentially sets become more dynamic.

One of the most straightforward uses of set actions is one that was demonstrated during Devs on Stage at TC18 – drilling down on the same sheet.  They showed a video that included drilling down on a treemap from one level of detail to a lower granularity, to a third granularity.

So my challenge for you this week is to learn more about sets and set actions.  You’ll find these to be extremely useful moving forward on drill-filtering on the same sheet – both on maps and when you’re trying to explore more detail.  Not a lot of showy formatting or sophisticated calculations – your only goal is to get comfortable with set actions.

click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 800; 2 sheets
  • Create a line chart of monthly sales
  • Create way for user to select months and drill/filter the line chart, this should also filter the treemap below
  • Create a treemap of sales by category that has the ability to drill to sub-category and product name upon clicking
  • Create dynamic labels (and tooltip) for the treemap that display based on the level of detail shown (category/sub-category/product name)
  • Match all other formatting, labels, and tooltips
  • Add a region filter for fun

FYI: Set Actions aren’t quite working on Tableau Public, so I encourage you to download the workbook and view in 2018.3 to explore the full interactivity!

Data from this week comes from the Saved Data Source in Tableau 2018 (Sample – Superstore), download here if needed.

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, and @RodyZakovich.  (Tag @VizWizBI if you have space, he would love to see your work too!)

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Week 41: Top & Bottom Highlights

This week’s workout is designed for the end user looking for immediate insight – think of an executive stakeholder or someone more drawn to quickly getting numbers and results.  These folks don’t necessarily have the time to look deeper into the details, but are still craving data in context.

To satisfy their requests you’ll be creating a small multiples dashboard that highlights different combinations of dimensions based on what the user selects.  It also has strategically placed labels that give the most pertinent information – total sales for the chart shown and the most recent monthly measurement.

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 900
  • Create small multiples showing monthly sales from 2017 & 2018 by Category and Region
  • Create color highlight to meet these 6 conditions
    • Highlight top category per region (by sales)
    • Highlight bottom category per region
    • Highlight top & bottom category per region
    • Highlight top region + category combination
    • Highlight bottom region + category combination
  • Create a label that shows the Total Sales in the top middle of each small multiple
  • Create a label that shows the most recent sales in the lower right of each small multiple
  • Create a dynamic title that changes based on the highlight chosen
  • Match tooltips and interactivity – mark type matters!
  • Match all formatting

Data from this week comes from the Saved Data Source in Tableau 2018 (Sample – Superstore), download here if needed.

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, and @RodyZakovich.  (Tag @VizWizBI if you have space, he would love to see your work too!)

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.