Date Archives December 2018

2019 Week 1: Sales Drill Down

We’re back for 2019. We’re using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019. The challenge this week involves building a dynamic drill-down table. This one is slightly more difficult than average so be sure to check the spoilers at the very bottom if need be.

Challenge

 


 

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size is 500px wide by 600px tall.
  • Create a table that shows sales for category and year. When you click on a category show the sales by sub-category below it.
  • Use the right arrow “►” and the down arrow “▼” to indicate when details are showing. This makes it look like an accordion.
  • Match row borders and row shading to highlight these values.

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2019 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden, @curtisharris_, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Spoilers

  • Union the data to itself one time.
  • One part of the union will create the summary for category and the other will create the summary for sub-category.

Week 52: Nobel Laureates, 1901 to Present

Congratulations for making it to the end of 2018 and the last workout of the year!  This week I’ve spiced things up a bit and decided to use a different data set.  The data you’ll be working with is a list of Nobel Prize Laureates from 1901 to 2018 (‘present’ at time of writing).  And I’ve chosen to use the data set to construct a timeline view.

This data set comes from a real life problem I solved recently – a way to work with multiple date columns to construct timelines.  You’ll be forced to work with the data set as-is, no reshaping the data.  And the goal is to display multiple dates as marks of different colors.  And true to form, you’ll also be constructing some custom labels, and be working on creating a drop-down that sorts both alphabetically and by dates.

I hope you’re intrigued!

Click to view interactive version on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1000 x 1200; you choose # of sheets
  • Create a timeline showing birth date, prize date(s), death date or today
    • Death date will be a circle, today will be a gantt bar
    • Assume that each prize is awarded on December 10th of every year
  • Color the dots of the prize dates according to their category
  • Create a line that goes from birth date to death/today depending on the person
  • Construct a label that is beneath each person’s timeline – make sure it only shows up once
    • Include critical birth/death dates
  • Create reference lines for December 1901, the first year of the prize and today (which should be dynamic)
  • Create a legend that acts as a filter
  • Construct sorting for each of the following
    • Alphabetical
    • Birth date newest/oldest
    • Prize date newest/oldest
    • Death date newest/oldest
  • Match formatting & tooltips
    • I’m using Tableau Medium and Tableau Bold this week
    • Colors are from Superfishel Stone

Dataset

This week uses a special Nobel Laureates data set modified from Kaggle (to include more birthdays, and default birth dates to January 1 of the year if unknown).  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2018 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden@curtisharris_@RodyZakovich, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Week 51: Container Fun!

Ok, this week is all about working with Containers. Now that we have the ability to control inner/outer padding on Dashboard objects, as well as color, we can really make our dashboards shine without having to float everything. Note on the week, the data/charts don’t really matter, I honestly just threw some on the dashboard. The challenge is about working with the containers, and matching the design given the requirements below. Good luck!

CLICK TO VIEW

 

Requirements

  • Dashboard size is 1250px wide by 750px tall.
  • ONLY USE CONTAINERS, NO FLOATING OBJECTS!
  • Dashboard has a total of 5 containers (no more, no less)
  • The Filter Pane.
    • 10px padding on the right/left side.
    • Each filter has 5px of padding
  • The Charts Pane.
    • All 3 charts must be in one vertical container
    • Background must be light grey
    • Each chart has 20 px of padding between them and other objects
    • Each chart has a grey border, slight darker than the Pane background color.
  • The Pane under the Title has a grey border.

Dataset

You can use any data set for this week’s challenge. but  you can get Superstore 2018.3 at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2018 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden,
@curtisharris_@RodyZakovich, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Week 50: What is the makeup of sales?

This week is another challenge that comes straight from work. I actually had difficulty creating the chart I wanted. I really wanted to sort the states by the selected Sub-Category percentage but I ran out of time and had to hack together a solution for this week. Either way the more important challenge is in creating the appropriate pie chart.

Challenge

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size is 800px wide by 800px tall.
  • Create a pie for each state
  • Use a parameter that describes each sub-category.
  • Highlight the sales of the selected sub-category. Also highlight the remaining sales for the remainder of sub-categories that are share the same category of the selected sub-category. The third category will be all other sub-categories.
  • Color by category. Use the Winter and Seattle Gray color palettes.
  • Jedi-level: no hard-coding category to sub-category.
  • Create the legend using a separate sheet.
  • Match tooltips.

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2018 and tag @AnnUJackson, @LukeStanke, @lorna_eden,
@curtisharris_, @RodyZakovich, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.

Week 49: Where Do Sub-Categories Succeed?

Last week I had the honor of attending Tapestry Conference in Miami.  While I was there Jon Schwabish gave a quick 6 minute talk that connected every chart to every other chart.  This along with some of Elijah Meek’s keynote mentioning that data viz is getting more custom and funky got me curious about some neglected chart types.  Combine this with a recent interest in how clustering works in Tableau and you’ve arrived at the genesis for this week’s challenge.  Your goal is to create a Parallel Coordinates chart (click the link if you’re not sure what it is).

This chart is perfect for multivariate analysis and seeing relationships among more than 2 measures (in this case 3).  It can also be useful for finding commonalities among things.  Traditionally I think most people may shy away from implementing this in Tableau because quite often different measures have different scales, so as part of the challenge, you’ll have to figure out how to overcome that obstacle to present a parallel coordinate chart with 3 measures of different magnitudes.

Also to help reinforce some recent challenges using table calculations – you are not allowed to use LODs and must only use table calculations and regular calcs.

Click to view on Tableau Public

Requirements

  • Dashboard size: 1200 x 850; you choose # of sheets
  • Create a parallel coordinate chart that shows Sales, Profit Ratio, and # Customers (CountD Customer Name) per sub-category
  • Do not use LODs, use table calculations (and normal calculated fields)
  • Each sub-category should be positioned based on its value, but all measures should be on one sheet
  • Ensure there is a dark gray vertical line for each measure
  • Label the top and bottom of each vertical line with the measure name and respective minimum or maximum
  • Color the lines based on which measure the sub-categories have the highest value in
  • Colors are based off of the Viridis color palette, which I encourage you to paste into your .TPS file
  • Create a color legend that has a hover action based on the newly defined colors (high sales, high profit ratio, high customers)
  • Match formatting & tooltips

Dataset

This week uses the superstore dataset for Tableau 2018.3.  You can get it here at data.world

Attribute

When you publish your solution on Tableau Public make sure to take the time and include a link to the original inspiration.

Share

After you finish your workout, share on Twitter using the hashtag #WorkoutWednesday2018 and tag @AnnUJackson@LukeStanke@lorna_eden@curtisharris_@RodyZakovich, and @VizWizBI!

Track your progress

Also, don’t forget to track your progress using this Workout Wednesday form.